The next big thing…

A Virtual LoveThere was a thing going around on the internet late last year called The Next Big Thing, in which writers answered questions about their next books.

I was kindly tagged not once but twice – by Ruth Dugdall and Marva Gregorio De Souza – but I am so absurdly late in answering that it’s probably called The Last Big Thing by now. In any case, here are my answers:

What is the working title of your book?

A Virtual Love. It’s out in April, and now has a cover design which I am showing for the first time.

Where did the idea come from for the book?

The book is concerned with the theme of identity, and how such an apparently simple, fixed concept as “who we really are” is quite contingent and subject to change. The idea came about as I thought about how modern technology helps us to shape our identities in quite different ways and change them at will, while putting extra pressure on us to make those identities acceptable to the watching world.

What genre does your book fall under?

Literary fiction

Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

This is going to sound like a copout, but I’m not going to name any. The reason is that I have a very clear image of the main characters in my head, and any real-life actors I tried to shoehorn into the roles just didn’t seem quite right. It’s like when you’ve read a book, and then watch the movie version later – often the actors seem wrong, because they’re displacing the images you’ve created yourself. Because I spent years writing this book, the problem is acute.

What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

What happens when you spend so long manufacturing identities for the outside world that you lose track of who you really are?

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

I’m represented by James Wills at Watson Little, and the book will be published by Legend Press.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

About a year and a half or a couple of years, I think. It was quite a long time ago now, as I’ve been through several more drafts since then!

What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

My aim was to write a book that is different from books already written.

Who or What inspired you to write this book?

My inspiration for writing this book was the same as my inspiration for writing in general – I write because I want to express my view of the world. For me a novel is an unparalleled opportunity to see the world through the eyes of another person. I hope that my ideas are interesting to others, and that I have shaped them into a compelling story that people will enjoy and find thought-provoking.

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

I made the narrative structure reflect the plot and characters. For example, the book is narrated by several characters but we never hear from the main character, for reasons which become clear in the final stages…

Next up

So now I have to tag five other writers to complete the same exercise. Here they are, in no particular order:

That’s it! Thanks again to Ruth and Marva, and hope it was interesting. If there’s anything else you’d like to know about the book or the writing of it, please ask!

LIKE THIS POST? SIGN UP FOR FREE UPDATES!

Comments

  1. Charles Anasco says

    Your response about the movie adaptation of the book is an interesting one. I guess I’m not an imaginative reader because I’ve rarely if really ever attached a visual image to a character. I am usually lost in the language of the book. Even when they painstakingly describe the character I just sort of file those details away and don’t really think about them. If there is a film adaptation later I might notice something like oh… the protagonist and the antagonist hair color was reversed. That isn’t to say that character isn’t important either because it certainly is. If a character or characters are flat than the writing won’t hold my attention for long.

    I’m very much looking forward to reading the book. I might venture to write a review but don’t expect me to help cast the movie :)

    • says

      Hi Charles

      I wouldn’t say you’re not an imaginative reader – just that you have a different type of imagination! From what you said about your reaction to my first book, I know you were busy imagining the characters and their lives, even if not in a physical way.

      I’m the same as you about skipping over detailed physical descriptions, by the way. But I do form an image myself, and certainly as I was writing this book I did. Interesting how the process of reading and imagining can be so different for different readers!

  2. says

    That’s great news Andrew, April isn’t that far off. I wish I could read your book but I’m not sure if I’ll get to do it, I never order from the net and if it’s not in the bookstores here chances are I won’t read it. But like somebody dear to me always says, there’s always a way. :)
    Welcome back!

  3. says

    Hi Andrew! I was about to leave a comment anyway when I saw you’d tagged me! I agree about the movie version – my characters have become too much themselves to be played by anyone else. I’d hope this happened for the reader too.
    I applaud your aim to write a book that’s different from those written before and look forward to the release of A Virtual Love! Now can I tag you? Is there an Undercover Soundtrack waiting to be written?

    • says

      Thanks Roz. Ah yes, that sounds good – I’ll get scribbling! Would it be OK to do it close to release date (1st April) so that people can buy the book if they’re inspired by my musical musings?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.